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Playwriting (7/12/21-7/15/21)

$200.00

In this workshop, you will learn why you might want to choose a play as the form for a story idea. And then, once you decide your idea is best expressed as a play, this workshop will teach you how to do that. Like other literary forms, drama has its own customs. Drama is a performance art. You will learn how, as a writer, to use the tools of drama—especially dialogue, character, voice, tone, and setting—to make your play express your ideas. The final project is writing a complete play of up to around 10 minutes in length. You can be working on this final project throughout the four-day workshop.

Dates: Monday-Thursday, 7/12/21-7/15/21
Time: 9 – 11 am (PT) // 12 – 2 pm (ET)
Ages: 9-14

Playwriting is now closed for registration. Please click here to check out our other camp opportunities.

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This class is about playwriting. We will start with the basics. What is a play? Where do plays come from? How have plays changed over time? How is drama different across different cultures? And, most importantly for you, as writers, how is a play different from a video, a movie, a story, or a poem?

If you are working on a play, or have already written one, please be prepared to share with the class on the first day. This class involves lots of group reading and group performance. Class participation is expected. As this is a drama class, I also ask that you attend the class with your video on.

In this workshop, you will learn why you might want to choose a play as the form for a story idea. And then, once you decide your idea is best expressed as a play, this workshop will teach you how to do that. Like other literary forms, drama has its own customs. Drama is a performance art. You will learn how, as a writer, to use the tools of drama—especially dialogue, character, voice, tone, and setting—to make your play express your ideas.

Every class will involve looking at plays on YouTube, reading plays and other texts, and writing in response to what we are seeing and reading. Some days you will write a complete play. Other days you will practice writing one or another aspect of playwriting, such as dialogue, stage direction, or shaping your drama to convey your intention as an author. The final project is writing a complete play of up to around 10 minutes in length. You can be working on this final project throughout the four-day workshop.

Minimum enrollment: 6
Maximum enrollment: 20
Should minimum enrollment not be met, we will contact you to offer a refund or other learning experience in exchange.

Cancellation Policy: Refunds will be given for cancellations requested two weeks or more in advance of camp. For cancellation requests received less than two weeks before camp, you will receive credit towards another camp or learning experience.


Stone Soup and Society of Young Inklings are both nonprofit organizations, and part of our collaborative mission is to celebrate the full, vibrant diversity of youth writers' voices and stories.

To apply for a scholarship, visit this link.
To donate in support of scholarships, visit this link.


This camp will be taught by William Rubel. William founded Stone Soup, the literary magazine by and for writers ages 9 to 14, in 1972 when he was a college student at the University of California, Santa Cruz. In addition to working on Stone Soup, William is a writer specializing in traditional foodways. His book on hearth cooking, The Magic of Fire (2002), won international prizes. His second book is Bread, a global history (2011). William is currently writing another book on the history of bread. He also publishes articles on different subjects like gardening, bread recipes, and wild mushrooms.

William lives in Santa Cruz with his daughter, Stella, and their cat, chickens, and aviary birds. You can read more about his other interests at his personal website.